Obligatory "ignore this space" : https://sacoronavirus.co.za

Hiding the facts is necessary unless we take the attitude that our way of counting time is the correct way. Converting our time to whatever it is they call the one which is marked with howling dogs and frightened cats is almost as easy as giving the routine a name, but were we to ask for someone else's input on the matter, their response is likely to be that their way of counting time is obviously the correct one, they might refer to businesses for corroboration, and we're likely to end up the conversation howling for frightened animals. How businesses count time is entirely their secret: though not animals, natural periods that affect us are fair game; and it would then be up to the technical department to compensate accordingly.

The Theory of Necessary Prevarication is what allows us to amuse people with the response, 'not that I know of.' A glass ceiling is that which allows us to pretend to be hunter-gatherers, and talk lasciviously about everything that upon the outside of a building is to be found. Finding that my powers of adaptation are as limited as everything else about me, I come to thinking of the ease which memories of people enjoy. But my sense of mirth gets the better of me before the second paragraph.

'Dear World,
Before I go, I'd like to save you the trouble of having to ask programmers what a dictionary is. Programmers must explain things by making use of a set of words that is given to them. For example, if they say, 'lexicographic,' the ensuing conversation--which might be a lengthy one--will result in an accusatory, 'why didn't you just say dictionary order?'
  I followed the sensation that explanations are unnecessary, but then I had to ask myself what I was talking to. A lexicographic ordering is easiest to describe with an algorithm. But dictionaries themselves make use of a cavern of special symbols, so the algorithm we write, if useful at all, will only be used by someone who's willing to amuse us through our toys.
  Let's have a rain-check on 'growing darkness, taking dawn'. I was me but now I must say 'cheers', which I started using in the days I thought the key to a happy life was the making of a wise choice. When I found the only awakening was to another day in which the only discovery to be made was that of yet being lost, I began to think that all explanations were futile. But before I introduce Greek and lose myself thereby in the enjoyment of speaking to no-one in particular, let me exit this with a non-zero value thinking both of a sewerage pipe, and those who didn't have the gift of bouyancy.
Cheers,
Brian.'

••
Feedback