Obligatory "ignore this space" : https://sacoronavirus.co.za

The Ultimate Fairytale : A short history of Greece, Rome, Israel, England, France, and Germany.

Dear M(r)?(i)?(s)?(s)? and M(r)?(i)?(s)?(s)? OCD and OCD,

Checksums are not one-to-one mappings, obviously. But one of the most useful utilities around, Rsync, makes use of them to make synchronization across the internet part of everyday life.

And then, checksums are used in Git, which utility has actually and truly made change control a pleasure!

The GUID, however, seems a bit ridiculous as we had no GPS's, did we?

Maybe that was on the horizon?

If we cannot get a truly unique identifier for our classes, then it seems that scripting languages have their limitations.

We are talking about the idea of things being large: numbers, that is.

Numbers themselves cannot be large: data is not a number.

If we are talking about large datasets, and we are OCD, our hearts rush towards the relational database.

And this is considered a disorder?

However, in programming of any sort one needs to be aware of the difference between a name and an identifier.

One requires far more identifiers than one can possibly hope to name correctly.

We might in our leisure go back to our work and, in the interests of clarity, attempt to rename things.

"Exactly how much time do you have, sir?"

"I don't know."

"Do you recall everywhere that you have used that identifier that you intend to rename?

"No, no you don't. You need to be aware of upgrade opportunities, and that one has no control over them."

The list of improvements that one wants to make, can hardly be kept in one's mind. To put them into words is to look back on them with annoyance!

A checklist and a todo list are very different things. But I seem to be wandering slightly from { main(); } in the programme called OCD.

There are those who are not entirely happy with relational databases themselves.

There seems to be room for improvements, but the upgrades we hear of, do not bring the improvements we hope for.

And thus we find ourselves telling ourselves just to be a little less OCD.

Lots of love,

Brian

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